Home

ANCIE Resources

Search/Filter



1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9
The Economic Performance of Children of Immigrants Relative to Children of Natives in Canada

Author(s): Leigh, John A.

Date: August, 2013

Summary

This paper examines that labour market performance of children of immigrants (second generation) relative to that of children of natives (third generation) in Canada using a Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method. The methodology allows for the difference in the average wage of second generation Canadians and that of third generation Canadians to be decomposed into explained component (that reflects differences in human capital characteristics such as experience and educational attaintment) and an unexplained component (that reflect difference in returns to human capital). On the whole, the results indicate that second generation Canadians (both sexes) earn about 6% to 10% more than third generation male and female Canadians. Most of the positive earning gap is attributed to difference in observable characteristics such as higher educational attainment and the higher concentration of second generation Canadians in Census Metropolitan Area's (CMA's) and high wage provinces such British Columbia. Also observed is that second generation Canadians enjoy a work experience premium relative to third generation Canadians of the same age.

 


Document: The Economic Performance of Children of Immigrants Relative to Children of Natives in Canada (.pdf)

Preparing the Children of Immigrants for Early Academic Success

Author(s): Robert Crosnoe

Date: July, 2013

Summary

Preparing the Children of Immigrants for Early Academic Success, the latest in a series of papers from the Migration Policy institute by Robert Crosnoe, explores which factors have the biggest impacts - both positive and negative - on the school readiness and early achievement of children from immigrant families, and examines three types of educational and health policy interventions that may reduce disparities between the children of U.S.-born parents and their immigrant counterparts: Expanded access to early childhood education, Policies that promote young children's physical health, and Efforts to forge family-school partnerships.


Document: Preparing the Children of Immigrants for Early Academic Success (.pdf)

Effects of Ontario's Immigration Policy on Young non-permanent residents between 2001 and 2006

Author(s): Lin Lu

Date: July, 2013

Summary

The object of this research is to assess the effects of Ontario’s new immigration policy on young non-permanent residents. In particular, it is to evaluate how the wage gap between young non-permanent residents and young Canadian citizens has changed in the labor market of Ontario from 2001 to 2006 to demonstrate influences of new policy. On November 21, 2005, the governments of Ontario and Canada signed the first Canada-Ontario immigration agreement that relaxed several requirements for temporary workers to apply for permanent residency. This paper selected data from the 2001 and 2006 population census to conduct a linear regression to analyze the wage gap and the effects of immigration policy. By using the difference-in-difference approach, this paper found that there was no significant positive effect of the new policy on the entry earnings of non-permanent residents in Ontario.

 


Document: Effects of Ontario's Immigration Policy on Young non-permanent residents between 2001 and 2006 (.pdf)

Canada’s Immigrant Families: Growth, Diversity and Challenges

Author(s): Sharon M. Lee and Barry Edmonston

Date: June, 2013

Summary

As immigration continues to be the main factor in Canada’s recent population growth, the number and proportion of Canada’s immigrant families have also increased, to almost one-fifth of all families in Canada by 2006. We begin with a comparison of immigrant families with non-immigrant families on several sociodemographic characteristics including family type and size and home language to show similarities and differences. Next, we highlight diversity of immigrant families along selected characteristics including place of birth, period of immigration, and socioeconomic characteristics such as education and employment. Finally, we identify some challenges for immigrant families and topics for future research, and conduct a more detailed analysis of low-income or poor immigrant families.

 


Document: Canada’s Immigrant Families: Growth, Diversity and Challenges (.pdf)

Overcoming Barriers to Post-Secondary Education for Karen Refugees in Langley and Surrey, BC

Author(s): Lisa Sadler

Date: June, 2013

Summary

Post‐secondary education is criticalto the long‐termresettlement and integration of Karen refugees. Post‐secondary education not only provides opportunitiesfor underprivileged familiesto improve their economic livelihood, but also to become healthy and contributing citizensin the local and global contexts. Nevertheless, Karen people who arrived in Canada between 2006 and 2010 asGovernment Assisted Refugeesfacemany barriersto theirresettlement and ultimately their ability to access post‐secondary education. In particular,these youth struggle with pre‐migration barriersincluding cultural challenges, and lack of education and English language skills.On the other hand,their post‐migration barriers are equally significant and include discrimination, culture shock andmental health issues, socioeconomic issues, and lack of parental or adult guidance.

 


Document: Overcoming Barriers to Post-Secondary Education for Karen Refugees in Langley and Surrey, BC (.pdf)

Gender, Acculturation, and Protective Factors in the Mental Health of Southeast Asian Youth in British Columbia

Author(s): Carla Theresa Hilario

Date: May, 2013

Summary

There is a substantial gap in research that examines mental health in immigrant and visible minority groups. Even less research has considered the link between acculturation, mental health, and protective factors among these adolescents. This study investigated gender and acculturation-related differences in mental health and identified protective factors that buffer against emotional distress among Southeast Asian youth in British Columbia

 


Document: Gender, Acculturation, and Protective Factors in the Mental Health of Southeast Asian Youth in BC (.pdf)

The Development of Young Children of Immigrants in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States

Author(s): Elizabeth Washbrook, Jane Waldfogel, Bruce Bradbury, Miles Corak, Ali Akbar Ghanghro

Date: May, 2013

Summary

Children of immigrants underperform their counterparts with native-born parents in vocabulary tests, particularly if a language other than the official language is spoken at home, but are not generally disadvantaged in nonverbal cognitive domains, nor are there notable behavioral differences. These findings suggest that the cross-country differences in cognitive outcomes during the teen years documented in the existing literature are much less evident during the early years.

 


Document: The Development of Young Children of Immigrants in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States (.pdf)

Vitamin D Insufficiency and Bone Mineral Status in a Population of Newcomer Children in Canada

Author(s): Hassanali Vatanparast, Christine Nisbet and Brian Gushulak

Date: May, 2013

Summary

Background: Low levels of circulating vitamin D are more likely to be found in those with darker skin pigmentation, who live in areas of high latitude, and who wear more clothing. We examined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and inadequacy in newcomer immigrant and refugee children. Methods: We evaluated circulating vitamin D status of immigrant children at the national level. Subsequently, we investigated vitamin D intake, circulating vitamin D status, and total body bone mineral content (TBBMC) in newcomer children living in Saskatchewan. Results: In the sample of newcomer children in Saskatchewan, the prevalence of inadequacy in calcium and vitamin D intakes was 76% and 89.4%, respectively. Vitamin D intake from food/supplement was significantly higher in immigrants compared to refugees, which accords with the significant difference in serum status. Circulating vitamin D status indicated that 29% of participants were deficient and another 44% had inadequate levels of serum 25(OH)D for bone health. Dietary vitamin D intake, sex, region of origin, and length of stay in Canada were significant predictors of serum vitamin D status. Results for TBBMC revealed that 38.6% were found to have low TBBMC compared to estimated values for age, sex, and ethnicity. In the regression model, after controlling for possible confounders, children who were taller and had greater circulating vitamin D also had greater TBBMC. Nationally, immigrant children, particularly girls, have significantly lower plasma 25(OH)D than non-immigrant children. Interpretation: Newcomer immigrant and refugee children are at a high risk of vitamin D deficiency and inadequacy, which may have serious negative consequences for their health.

 


Document: Vitamin D Insufficiency and Bone Mineral Status in a Population of Newcomer Children in Canada (.pdf)

Child Labour is No Accident - The Experience of BC's Working Children

Author(s): First Call - BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition

Date: May, 2013

Summary

This report brings together this research with other existing studies to examine the consequences of the legislative changes in BC in relation to three areas of impact: health and safety, wages and working conditions, and education. It also contrasts BC’s law with employment standards in other jurisdictions.

 


Document: Child Labour is No Accident - The Experience of BC's Working Children (.pdf)

Acculturation and Nutritional Health of Immigrants in Canada: A Scoping Review

Author(s): Dia Sanou, Erin O’Reilly, Ismael Ngnie-Teta, Malek Batal, Nathalie Mondain, Caroline Andrew, Bruce K. Newbold, Ivy L. Bourgeault

Date: April, 2013

Summary

Although recent immigrants to Canada are healthier than Canadian born (i.e., the Healthy Immigrant Effect), they experience a deterioration in their health status which is partly due to transitions in dietary habits. Since pathways to these transitions are under-documented, this scoping review aims to identify knowledge gaps and research priorities related to immigrant nutritional health. A total of 49 articles were retrieved and reviewed using electronic databases and a stakeholder consultation was undertaken to consolidate findings. Overall, research tends to confirm the Healthy Immigrant Effect and suggests that significant knowledge gaps in nutritional health persist, thereby creating a barrier to the advancement of health promotion and the achievement of maximum health equity. Five research priorities were identified including (1) risks and benefits associated with traditional/ethnic foods; (2) access and outreach to immigrants; (3) mechanisms and coping strategies for food security; (4) mechanisms of food choice in immigrant families; and (5) health promotion strategies that work for immigrant populations.

 


Document: Acculturation and Nutritional Health of Immigrants in Canada: A Scoping Review (.pdf)


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9